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Old 01-30-2017, 01:06 PM   #1
mulan
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Default Is SPD a real thing?

I have come across some academic papers on SPD. From what I read the case of SPD as a single personality disorder is not very strong.
Some papers even sugested that it shouldn't exist as a diagnosis.

Anyway, people classified as having SPD may fall into two categories. The more avoident ones and the more schizotipical ones.

What is your opinion about this? And in what category do you think you belong?

I am sure I am not schizotipical. I am a little avoidant.
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Old 01-30-2017, 01:13 PM   #2
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In my opinion it shouldn't exist. It is sort of pathologizing extreme introvertness that is mixed with random things. I actually don't believe in schizotypal either. I believe in the symptoms but I don't believe in the way they are pushed together.

I was once diagnosed with both at the same time. It never made sense.
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Old 01-30-2017, 05:50 PM   #3
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

For me it doesn't make much sense either. The general symptoms are definitely there.
But it paints a picture that doesn't fit me. There are so many nuances it doesn't explain. And I can find other reasons and causes for the different symptoms. I think it is just a description. But there are many people who have the same main symptoms, but at the core don't feel at all like me.
I feel I am being reduced to something when the reality is much more nuanced.
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Old 02-05-2017, 07:01 AM   #4
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

AvPD I can understand. It's kind of straightforward, a pattern carried from childhood, from being invisible or criticized and never allowed to be OK as one is in other people's eyes. It's very easy to internalize other people's ideas.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:07 AM   #5
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

Several well-known, reliable, sites describe SPD well/believably, including the Mayo Clinic and Here:

https://psychcentral.com/disorders/s...rder-symptoms/

It sounds like a real thing to me.
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Old 02-05-2017, 03:11 PM   #6
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

The symptoms can be real but the grouping them into one diagnosis can be wrong and sometimes we pathologize normal behavior.

Also the information on that page is incorrect. The main difference between SPD and Aspergers is that there are good social skills in SPD, they are not used. The page claims SPD has poor social skills.

I am also a little suspicious when people claim someone does not enjoy things, that they are unemotional and cold. I have been accused of this because I might not show everything on the outside. But believe me, inside I am a real human being! Not a robot. Have been accused of not liking things when people tried to force the type of humor on me I dislike or take part in "fun" things like partying or shopping. Oh so then Jimi does not like anything! Well I do. What I like they find boring though.

SPD lost at least half of their recruits to the Aspergers diagnosis. Some are now diagnosed dysthymic, which is a mood disorder.

The core of SPD should be detachment from others, is this thing really ground for giving people a label of a personality DISORDER? Not so sure. We can't all be social butterflies. But already just being an introvert is seen as pathological these days.....
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Old 02-05-2017, 03:12 PM   #7
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...............

Last edited by -jimi-; 02-05-2017 at 03:19 PM.. Reason: double post
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Old 02-05-2017, 03:15 PM   #8
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

As for schizotypal, it was rendered so mixed in symptoms, some from mild schizophrenia, some from severe social anxiety and some from autism, that it was scratched as a diagnosis. It was actually put back before the new DSM was finished, but it was not an unanimous decision.
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Old 02-25-2017, 05:01 AM   #9
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Default Re: Is SPD a real thing?

I have schizophrenia, and they were very hesitant to diagnosis me also with SPD. Still, they did. My thing is that the whether or not something is a "disorder" is supposed to based on whether or not it affects function. I've done a lot of work into faking being a "social person." People with social anxiety have anxiety. I do not. People on the autism spectrum have their own issue. They literally have issues being able to perform basic social skills. I do not. I'm considered really eccentric. I admit, but it's not because I don't know how or can't act "normal." I just don't care. I follow social "rules" to get what I want out of given situation. I'm not a sociopath. I don't play mind games with people. (I don't enjoy that.) Being actually diagnosed with SPD isn't exactly like being an introvert. Basically, you don't need people to fulfill you. This doesn't mean your shy either. I am very assertive. I can sell sand to someone who lives in the Sahara, and it doesn't make me nervous. Still, you could be trapped in a room for a year. You might get bored. You might go mad, but it's not because you are craving social interaction. You just don't REQUIRE human interaction. The problem with listing SPD as a disorder is that people, who formally meet the requirements, aren't suffering. The people that are suffering are family and "friends."
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