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Old 02-26-2019, 10:49 PM #1
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Trig eyes

I have a couple general interest questions.

First, (therapists, psychologists etc. no offense), why is it that people working in mental health have to stare so unwaveringly at patients? I get that they are gauging body language, eye contact etc. to fill in gaps that patients are not revealing, but come on. Eye contact is one thing, but that dead on stare is downright predatory. Forget that society considers continuous staring improper. Having someone sit still and stare when a person is in trouble, seems deleterious. No one says they have to cry or hug, but a polite drop of the eyes, might be better. That does not mean embarrassment or disengaging from the moment. Call it common courtesy. If you watch an animal hone in on prey, they use the same stare. Intent, watching and waiting for the prey to reveal a weakness or move. While that effect is surely not intended, the result can feel the same.

The second question is similar as it started from looking up stares. Psychopaths, who also have that predatory stare, though not for the same reason, don't report nightmares about what they have done. At least, I've never read about one who did. Lack of emotion may seem like the obvious answer, but doesn't add up. (I'm talking about violent psychopaths, not business ones).
Possible trigger:
Still, a psychopath can enjoy a meal, or sex or an adrenaline rush, and while those may seem like physical reactions, they aren't entirely physical. Depression can make everything taste like cardboard, while joy can make bland food taste good. So, why then, are psychopaths unmoved by carnage?

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Last edited by bluekoi; 02-27-2019 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Add triggger icon. Apply trigger code.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:24 AM #2
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I have never experienced this, Sam2, so unfortunately I don't have a lot of advice to give to you. I hope other people here on PC will be able to help you better than me. I understand why you'd feel bothered by therapists staring at you, though. I'd suggest to talk to your therapist about this and see how it goes from there. Hopefully he/she will understand. Perhaps he/she will try to control his/her behavior. He/she's there to help you, after all. Feeling comfortable during your therapy sessions is very important. Remember that we're here for you if you need it. Feel free to PM me anytime. Let me know if I can do something to help you. I'm so sorry you have to deal with this
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Old 03-06-2019, 12:05 AM #3
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Hi Sam2,

I think staring at someone when they're say walking down the road or sitting in the park or just trying to mind their own business, could be considered rude or could understandably make people feel uncomfortable, yes. But for a lot of people, making eye contact in the situation of someone talking to you or you talking to them is considered proper or considerate because it shows the person you're giving them your attention. You're not looking around, up at the sky, checking your phone, watching people walking down the street etc., no - you're looking into the eyes of the person who is talking to you - you're listening. I think it's a good thing personally. And it's a sign that the therapist is listening to you as well.
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Old 03-07-2019, 02:47 AM #4
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Default Re: eyes

I am confused... are you trying to relate psychopathy with staring, predatory behavior and violence? Or psychopathic staring to therapy staring? Or do you mean to bring both individually?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam2 View Post
I have a couple general interest questions.

First, (therapists, psychologists etc. no offense), why is it that people working in mental health have to stare so unwaveringly at patients? I get that they are gauging body language, eye contact etc. to fill in gaps that patients are not revealing, but come on. Eye contact is one thing, but that dead on stare is downright predatory. Forget that society considers continuous staring improper. Having someone sit still and stare when a person is in trouble, seems deleterious. No one says they have to cry or hug, but a polite drop of the eyes, might be better. That does not mean embarrassment or disengaging from the moment. Call it common courtesy. If you watch an animal hone in on prey, they use the same stare. Intent, watching and waiting for the prey to reveal a weakness or move. While that effect is surely not intended, the result can feel the same.

The second question is similar as it started from looking up stares. Psychopaths, who also have that predatory stare, though not for the same reason, don't report nightmares about what they have done. At least, I've never read about one who did. Lack of emotion may seem like the obvious answer, but doesn't add up. (I'm talking about violent psychopaths, not business ones).
Possible trigger:
Still, a psychopath can enjoy a meal, or sex or an adrenaline rush, and while those may seem like physical reactions, they aren't entirely physical. Depression can make everything taste like cardboard, while joy can make bland food taste good. So, why then, are psychopaths unmoved by carnage?

Thanks
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