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Old 12-21-2017, 09:14 PM   #1
Nike007
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Trig What Happens During Inpatient?

Hi. I'm just really curious. I personally am not doing good, and probably shouldn't be at my house doing things. All I can think of is
Possible trigger:
I just can't right now, as my family expects me to do things with them, and I'm going on vacation in a few days. My family is really against mental illness, so I just can't go now. I just feel really awful and terrible. But if I were to go, which probably will be in a few weeks if this keeps up, what happens? Like, you stay over there or something, and do therapy? They give you medication? I don't really know what happens.

I went to emergency one time, but they didn't keep me overnight. Their help lasted me only 2 days before it was just as bad so I probably should have been hospitalized then.

Also, I have heard it costs money, but at least for me, I'm in Canada, so I don't think this would cost me anything, right? A lot of me is scared about doing something like this because I'm scared about what is going to happen. I have heard they do assessments daily or something. Do I need to bring things with me other than medication? Like, do I need clothes?

Any information about what happens is appreciated.
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Old 12-21-2017, 09:37 PM   #2
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

I live in the us so this might not be the same.

Intake though an ER is a very long process and you tell your story over and over to different people with a long down time inbetween people.

When you finally get to the floor you will be physically examined for marks and contraband. Your belongings will be gone though and there may be things your not allowed.

They usually wake early and take vitals. There's breakfast and then it depends on the hospital wether or not there's groups to participate in or if you just wait around to see a doctor.

Then lunch.

Maybe groups

Supper

Bedtime.

What time you get meds depends on if you are prescribed and what kind but you'll probably be told to line up to get them

I've heard people in Canada get your own phone and/or computer access something I've never had at any psych hospital. Really it's quite boring and invasive.
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Old 12-21-2017, 09:39 PM   #3
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Me again. Sorry I seem to be stalking your threads. Lol

I'm in Alberta and was in patient sept/oct. I was accessed in the ER and spent hours in a padded type room meeting with doctors and nurses. 2 separate psychiatrists need to see you in order to certify you (30 day hold, but they can discharge you earlier).

After you are certified (you can also be voluntary, but I never am) they take all your belongings and clothes and you wear hospital clothes. You get a room. I was in high observation by the nurses desk. Sometimes you have a roommate in the regular rooms.

You will get your regular meds until you see the unit psychiatrist. He/she will give their diagnosis (same or different) and adjust your meds as needed.

Everything is very controlled. The nurses do vitals and give meds on time. Meals are at specific times though you get input into your food. There are group activities during the day they expect you to attend. You see your psychiatrist every day to monitor your progress. No therapy, just stabilization. You are not allowed off unit at first. You earn your priveledges by making good choices. People can come to visit you at certain times. You eventually earn the ability to wear your own clothes again.

There were puzzles and games and a TV there too. As well as the company of people facing challenges just like you. Downside: no cell phones. That was tough.

All of my visit was free. It was totally worth it when I tanked. In patient has saved my life more than once.

More questions, let me know. This should give you an idea of what it's like.
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Old 12-21-2017, 09:50 PM   #4
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nammu View Post
I live in the us so this might not be the same.

Intake though an ER is a very long process and you tell your story over and over to different people with a long down time inbetween people.

When you finally get to the floor you will be physically examined for marks and contraband. Your belongings will be gone though and there may be things your not allowed.

They usually wake early and take vitals. There's breakfast and then it depends on the hospital wether or not there's groups to participate in or if you just wait around to see a doctor.

Then lunch.

Maybe groups

Supper

Bedtime.

What time you get meds depends on if you are prescribed and what kind but you'll probably be told to line up to get them

I've heard people in Canada get your own phone and/or computer access something I've never had at any psych hospital. Really it's quite boring and invasive.
Thanks for your information. Getting through the ER was a really long process. When I went, I told the same thing to several different people. First, the person who asked why I was there, then the nurse who looked at my forms, then the person who gave me my wristband, then the doctor I saw, then a crisis worker. I was also given a police officer or security guard to watch me to ensure I was safe and didn't do anything. My vitals were taken, but I was really anxious, so they were really off for my normal. But the crisis worker said I could go home or stay, depending on what I wanted. I had a choice. I decided to go, which ended up being a bad idea in the end; I should have stayed.

So I can/need to bring things? Like, I need to pack a bag of clothes, toothbrushes, hairbrush, etc.?

What do you do if you aren't waiting to see a doctor or are not in therapy? Sit around?

I honestly would need to keep my phone. I can't let my family know, so I would have to tell them I am fine once a day so they don't get worried. I don't know what else I can do to stop this. I just can't let them know.
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Old 12-21-2017, 10:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSadGirl View Post
Me again. Sorry I seem to be stalking your threads. Lol

I'm in Alberta and was in patient sept/oct. I was accessed in the ER and spent hours in a padded type room meeting with doctors and nurses. 2 separate psychiatrists need to see you in order to certify you (30 day hold, but they can discharge you earlier).

After you are certified (you can also be voluntary, but I never am) they take all your belongings and clothes and you wear hospital clothes. You get a room. I was in high observation by the nurses desk. Sometimes you have a roommate in the regular rooms.

You will get your regular meds until you see the unit psychiatrist. He/she will give their diagnosis (same or different) and adjust your meds as needed.

Everything is very controlled. The nurses do vitals and give meds on time. Meals are at specific times though you get input into your food. There are group activities during the day they expect you to attend. You see your psychiatrist every day to monitor your progress. No therapy, just stabilization. You are not allowed off unit at first. You earn your priveledges by making good choices. People can come to visit you at certain times. You eventually earn the ability to wear your own clothes again.

There were puzzles and games and a TV there too. As well as the company of people facing challenges just like you. Downside: no cell phones. That was tough.

All of my visit was free. It was totally worth it when I tanked. In patient has saved my life more than once.

More questions, let me know. This should give you an idea of what it's like.
It's okay. I just have a lot of questions on my mind and am just trying to distract myself from thoughts.

I don't think I could stay for a whole month. I have school. Missing a month is like missing 1/4 of my education, which is wasting a lot of money. My education is what stopped me from staying the last time. School makes me anxious.

So they give me clothes, and I don't need to bring clothes? I don't know how much I can handle being with other people. People stress me out a lot.

What do you mean by "not allowed off unit"? What does this mean? Like, can you leave, but must come back or something?

I can't handle no cell phones. I have to tell my parents I'm fine or else they will worry a lot about me.

What do or can I bring? What happens with people who don't get up when asked? I have been struggling to get up recently.

So there is no therapy? How do you get stabilized then? Just medication then?

Thanks for your help.
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Old 12-21-2017, 10:14 PM   #6
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

They give you a hospital gown and pants and slippers to wear. You get to wear normal clothes eventually. I didn't wear mine for 2 weeks and had my husband bring them in.

The units are locked. You can't get in or out without being buzzes. Not allowed off unit means they will not let you out of that unit and its locked. You can't leave. You get passes to leave the unit when they deem you safe and not a flight risk. It starts with 15 min passes and increases eventually to over nights off the unit.

No cell phone was a firm rule. They did have a phone you could use to call people though.

They take everything when you get to the unit. I was allowed only magazines and books at first. Eventually you are allowed more, but everything is run through the nurses first to make sure its safe.

I was allowed to sleep constantly for the first week. After that they threatened to remove my bed from my room if I wasn't up at 8. I learned to stay awake until my psychiatrist left the unit and then I went back to bed. Lol.

No therapy. Meds and group sessions with routine and rest.
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Old 12-21-2017, 11:12 PM   #7
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSadGirl View Post
They give you a hospital gown and pants and slippers to wear. You get to wear normal clothes eventually. I didn't wear mine for 2 weeks and had my husband bring them in.



The units are locked. You can't get in or out without being buzzes. Not allowed off unit means they will not let you out of that unit and its locked. You can't leave. You get passes to leave the unit when they deem you safe and not a flight risk. It starts with 15 min passes and increases eventually to over nights off the unit.



No cell phone was a firm rule. They did have a phone you could use to call people though.



They take everything when you get to the unit. I was allowed only magazines and books at first. Eventually you are allowed more, but everything is run through the nurses first to make sure its safe.



I was allowed to sleep constantly for the first week. After that they threatened to remove my bed from my room if I wasn't up at 8. I learned to stay awake until my psychiatrist left the unit and then I went back to bed. Lol.



No therapy. Meds and group sessions with routine and rest.


I see... do you think itíd be different for voluntary though? I donít think theyíd force me. Like, how did you end up there? Did you go voluntary, and then they made you stay there involuntary?

I see... Iíd be going by myself probably. I donít want family to know and donít really have friends so... I guess I can just bring them with me and then they give it to me when needed. I may talk to a friend about it though. We arenít that close. Just someone from class in which I have in common about having accommodations in school and LBGT stuff. Iíve talked to her a few times. She understands mental illness at least so.

I see... I donít think Iíd leave anywhere though. I donít have anywhere to go.

Ok. Part of me is scared too, since Iím only 18. Im currently not used to being treated like an adult at the moment. I feel like people treat me a lot like a mature kid.

What do the group sessions entail? I hate groups. Groups stress me a lot.

Iím good with sleeping.

Thanks for the help.
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RX: Prozac 20 mg; BuSpar 10 mg 2x a day; Ativan 0.5 mg PRN; Omega 3 Fish Oil; Trazodone, 50 mg (sleep); Melatonin 3-9 mg

Previous RX: Zoloft, 25-75mg; Lexapro 5-15mg; Luvox 25-50mg; Effexor XR 37.5-225mg


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Old 12-22-2017, 08:10 AM   #8
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

Voluntary admissions are definitely different. I have never been voluntary. I've been taken by police and by ambulance. I was committed for the first time when I was not much older than you. I think has voluntary they don't take your clothes away or restrict your ability to leave the unit as much.

The group sessions varied greatly. Some were talking about issues that we face with mental illness. Some were walking the hospital and chit chatting. The hospital I was in also had a gym and rock climbing to attend as a group. So they revolved around physical and mental health. The hospital ran 3 groups per day, an hour each. I was signed up for everyone that was applicable to me, but ultimately if I didn't want to go, I didn't.
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Old 12-22-2017, 01:14 PM   #9
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Default Re: What Happens During Inpatient?

It's different everywhere. As for taking vitals - they didn't, really. I had to weigh frequently when I'd quit eating, and occasional blood draws but not often (I think only for medication level checks), and very occasionally blood pressure, but that's about it. (When I was inpatient this summer for new medication, they did took my vitals twice a day) I've always been allowed to wear my ownn clothes, except in the seclusion room (NOT a good place to end up in - they lock the door and you're left with a plastic matress, an untearable blanket, an untearable dress, and a paper undershort. And your thoughts. Mainly your thoughts.), even when I was sectioned. I think I remember they quickly searched my stuff when I arrived but honestly, if you want to hurt yourself, you'll find some stuff to hurt yourself with. (Unless you're in seclusion, or on constant observation) My shoes and shoelaces weren't taken (except while in seclusion) although I didn't use them for the attempt/s I did while there.

Crisis wards don't generally do a lot, or any, therapy.
I seem to remember you're still in high school - a lot of child/youth/teen wards have you bring your books and work on homework while there (unless you really are unable to - as in, the pdoc says you're unable to). Sometimes it's on the ward, sometimes in an attached classroom, my 'own' facility center worked together with a SpecEd school - the school had a location in town, a small location on the grounds of the facility for people who had to stay near (for example because of sometimes needing nurse's help, and patients with eating disorders also went there - both so they didn't have to cycle to the other location, and because some of them returned to their ward during snack time and lunch to eat there), and 1 classroom attached to the crisis ward where crisis ward stayees went (although I had a classmate in the on-the-grounds-location who stayed in the crisis ward but was in the bigger school because she was in the crisis ward for a long time, and a fellow youth who had the room next to me went to school 'in' the crisis ward because she needed a lot of extra help - the crisis ward classroom is modelled differently (more three connected offices than a real classroom), it generally has less students, and most importantly, always has 2 teachers staffing it instead of 1).
I was always allowed to keep my phone and laptop, although my 'usual' hospital does I think have a rule they can take it away if it's really interfering with you getting better (never seen that happen though) (well on the autism ward there was a boy who had brought his PlayStation or xBox or something and he could use that with the night nurse's bedroom's TV, but only for 2 hours a day), and the hospital I spent the first part of my sectioning in discussed phone and laptop and email practice every admission - I remember one girl who was only allowed her ipad for a couple of hours a day. Although you had to hand in all electronics before bedtime and got them back after breakfast - I only had to do that the first night though, because I was locked in seclusion all the other nights.

Hospitals can help you keep yourself safe. THEY don't really keep you safe, because if you're that desperate, everything is, or can be used as, a weapon.

My hospitals stays were fairly unusual in length though - crisis ward stays are fairly long in my country compared to the US (where they only last a few days, while mine are usually for a week or one and a half week I think - not sure, never really paid much attention it while there - unless they hospitalize you just for the weekend or something. But my shortest stay was a little over month I think. (Shortest crisis ward stay - I've been in for a week a couple of times for intensive trauma treatment, as in, 3-5 hours of EMDR a day). Not counting the time I only stayed a weekend, but that was because after the weekend I went back to the residential ward.

Pdoc talks with the nurses every morning during what they call 'Check & Adjust' (translated from my language) but you don't see the pdoc every day. I think I saw him once a week for a general appointment, once a week for evaluation (where my parents also came) or maybe not even the general appointment once. And sometimes when the nurses were worried about me (such as when I'd totally stopped drinking).

Maybe I'll add more later on - now have to go downstairs for tea.
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Old 12-22-2017, 03:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breadfish View Post
It's different everywhere. As for taking vitals - they didn't, really. I had to weigh frequently when I'd quit eating, and occasional blood draws but not often (I think only for medication level checks), and very occasionally blood pressure, but that's about it. (When I was inpatient this summer for new medication, they did took my vitals twice a day) I've always been allowed to wear my ownn clothes, except in the seclusion room (NOT a good place to end up in - they lock the door and you're left with a plastic matress, an untearable blanket, an untearable dress, and a paper undershort. And your thoughts. Mainly your thoughts.), even when I was sectioned. I think I remember they quickly searched my stuff when I arrived but honestly, if you want to hurt yourself, you'll find some stuff to hurt yourself with. (Unless you're in seclusion, or on constant observation) My shoes and shoelaces weren't taken (except while in seclusion) although I didn't use them for the attempt/s I did while there.

Crisis wards don't generally do a lot, or any, therapy.
I seem to remember you're still in high school - a lot of child/youth/teen wards have you bring your books and work on homework while there (unless you really are unable to - as in, the pdoc says you're unable to). Sometimes it's on the ward, sometimes in an attached classroom, my 'own' facility center worked together with a SpecEd school - the school had a location in town, a small location on the grounds of the facility for people who had to stay near (for example because of sometimes needing nurse's help, and patients with eating disorders also went there - both so they didn't have to cycle to the other location, and because some of them returned to their ward during snack time and lunch to eat there), and 1 classroom attached to the crisis ward where crisis ward stayees went (although I had a classmate in the on-the-grounds-location who stayed in the crisis ward but was in the bigger school because she was in the crisis ward for a long time, and a fellow youth who had the room next to me went to school 'in' the crisis ward because she needed a lot of extra help - the crisis ward classroom is modelled differently (more three connected offices than a real classroom), it generally has less students, and most importantly, always has 2 teachers staffing it instead of 1).
I was always allowed to keep my phone and laptop, although my 'usual' hospital does I think have a rule they can take it away if it's really interfering with you getting better (never seen that happen though) (well on the autism ward there was a boy who had brought his PlayStation or xBox or something and he could use that with the night nurse's bedroom's TV, but only for 2 hours a day), and the hospital I spent the first part of my sectioning in discussed phone and laptop and email practice every admission - I remember one girl who was only allowed her ipad for a couple of hours a day. Although you had to hand in all electronics before bedtime and got them back after breakfast - I only had to do that the first night though, because I was locked in seclusion all the other nights.

Hospitals can help you keep yourself safe. THEY don't really keep you safe, because if you're that desperate, everything is, or can be used as, a weapon.

My hospitals stays were fairly unusual in length though - crisis ward stays are fairly long in my country compared to the US (where they only last a few days, while mine are usually for a week or one and a half week I think - not sure, never really paid much attention it while there - unless they hospitalize you just for the weekend or something. But my shortest stay was a little over month I think. (Shortest crisis ward stay - I've been in for a week a couple of times for intensive trauma treatment, as in, 3-5 hours of EMDR a day). Not counting the time I only stayed a weekend, but that was because after the weekend I went back to the residential ward.

Pdoc talks with the nurses every morning during what they call 'Check & Adjust' (translated from my language) but you don't see the pdoc every day. I think I saw him once a week for a general appointment, once a week for evaluation (where my parents also came) or maybe not even the general appointment once. And sometimes when the nurses were worried about me (such as when I'd totally stopped drinking).

Maybe I'll add more later on - now have to go downstairs for tea.
Thank you so much for the information. I don't know how well I'd tolerate wearing hospital clothes, as if they have tags, I'm going to have a lot of sensory issues. I can't stand tags.

What is the seclusion room? Are you by yourself in a room with nothing pretty much? What does it mean to be sent to this room?

Yes, the self-harm aspect probably wouldn't do much for me.
Possible trigger:
Though sharp objects do trigger severe thoughts of SH.

When I went to the ER for suicidal thoughts before, they put a security guard or police officer on me to make sure I didn't do anything.

I am not in high school anymore, and am no longer deemed a child or youth, so I would be in the adult ward. But I still have school work to do. I am now in post-secondary education getting an engineering degree.

I guess I would have to ask the hospital that I go to about their electronics policy if I do end up going.

Yes, I realize this. My mind has pretty much turned everything into a weapon. Now it's just me resisting these urges.

I don't know how long is typical here in Canada. I hope it's no longer than a week, but I could be fine with 2 weeks if needed. I just can't miss too much of school. The first week back in the next semester is really boring anyways, so I'm fine with missing this to get myself sorted out pretty much.

I have read somewhere that the staff make evaluations on you everyday or something. Like when did they do an evaluation on you? Was it during the first few days?

Thank you for your help.
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Previous RX: Zoloft, 25-75mg; Lexapro 5-15mg; Luvox 25-50mg; Effexor XR 37.5-225mg


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