Psych Central

Go Back   Forums at Psych Central > >



advertisement
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-10-2019, 06:33 PM   #1
Dnester
Poohbah
 
Dnester's Avatar
Dnester has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 1,359 (SuperPoster!)
My Mood: DID in the US

65 hugs
given
Default DID in the US

I was diagnosed DID NOS in 2005 or so. Cant remember exact year. I do not believe I have this. I was just curious about the fact that it is very rare. How hard is it to disgnose. The reason I sm asking is because another person gave her a rating on a website and said she was obsessed with DID and gave those diagnosis freely. The thing is though is that I have no recollection of anything we discussed. She shredded my file but said she woulf be willing to talk to my new T. Im interested and scared. Anyone know about US guidelines in diagnosing this disorder?

Last edited by Dnester; 01-10-2019 at 06:47 PM..
Dnester is online now   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:

advertisement
Old 01-10-2019, 08:43 PM   #2
amandalouise
Wise Elder
 
amandalouise's Avatar
amandalouise has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 8,117 (SuperPoster!)
10 yr Member
744 hugs
given
PC PoohBah!
Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dnester View Post
I was diagnosed DID NOS in 2005 or so. Cant remember exact year. I do not believe I have this. I was just curious about the fact that it is very rare. How hard is it to disgnose. The reason I sm asking is because another person gave her a rating on a website and said she was obsessed with DID and gave those diagnosis freely. The thing is though is that I have no recollection of anything we discussed. She shredded my file but said she woulf be willing to talk to my new T. Im interested and scared. Anyone know about US guidelines in diagnosing this disorder?
the diagnostic criteria you are looking for is in a book called the DSM 5 (DSM 5 stands of Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5th edition,) this is what psychiatrists go by for diagnosing DID here in america, since 2013, please keep in mind that treatment providers also receive whats called "supplemental updates" which are updates since 2013 that only treatment providers receive and have access to. ...

Dissociative Identity Disorder 300.14 (F44.81)

A. Disruption of identity characterized by two or more distinct personality states which may be described in some cultures as an experience of possession. The disruption in identity involves marked discontinuity in sense of self and sense of agency, accompanied by related alterations in affect, behavior, consciousness, memory, perception, cognition, and or sensory-motor functioning. These signs and symptoms may be observed by others or reported by the individual.

B. Recurrent gaps in the recall of every day events, important personal information, and or traumatic events that are inconstant with ordinary forgetting.

C the symptoms cause clinical significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning.

D. The disturbance is not a normal part of a broadly accepted cultural or religious practice.

Note in children the symptoms are not better explained by imaginary playmates or other fantasy play.

E. The Symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g. Blackouts or chaotic behavior during alcohol intoxication) or another medical condition (e.g. complex partial seizures)

....................

along with this diagnostic criteria are 5 pages that go into more detail in categories of diagnostic features that explains the above diagnostics in more detail, Associated features supporting diagnosis, the statistical prevalence of the disorder, the development and course of the disorder, Risk and Prognosis Factors, Culture Related Diagnostic Issues, Suicide Risks and the Functional consequences of this disorder. The DSM 5 also addresses Differential Diagnosis (other dissociative disorders that share the same symptoms) and Comorbidity (having more than one diagnosis)

your treatment provider can show you their copy of the DSM 5 and explain more in detail what all the definitions are at this time and how this fits with you and why they diagnosed you as DID.

if you dont believe you have DID you can request retesting. theres lots of tests involved with diagnosing mental disorders here in america now. the tests can not be found on line you get them from a psychiatrist or psychologist who's licensing allows them to administer these tests.
amandalouise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 12:28 AM   #3
sheltiemom2007
Member
sheltiemom2007 has no updates.
 
Member Since: Jan 2019
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 48
My Mood: DID in the US

Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dnester View Post
I was diagnosed DID NOS in 2005 or so. Cant remember exact year. I do not believe I have this. I was just curious about the fact that it is very rare. How hard is it to disgnose. The reason I sm asking is because another person gave her a rating on a website and said she was obsessed with DID and gave those diagnosis freely. The thing is though is that I have no recollection of anything we discussed. She shredded my file but said she woulf be willing to talk to my new T. Im interested and scared. Anyone know about US guidelines in diagnosing this disorder?

If you question the diagnosis, definitely get a second opinion from someone who is qualified to do the differential. Ask your psychiatrist for a referal to someone he's comfortable with. DID is not a label you want to have if it's not your diagnosis. The stigma that DID carries in the mental health treatment community is huge. Plus, you might be getting the wrong treatment for the illness you do have. Go for a second opinion and take it from there.
sheltiemom2007 is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Hugs from:
Old 01-11-2019, 05:08 AM   #4
MickeyCheeky
Wise Elder
 
MickeyCheeky's Avatar
MickeyCheeky My echo is the only voice coming back
 
Member Since: Jun 2016
Location: Italy
Posts: 9,065 (SuperPoster!)
My Mood: DID in the US

2 yr Member
26.7k hugs
given
PC PoohBah!
Default Re: DID in the US

I agree, Dnester. Get a second opinion from a professional if you feel like you may have been uncorrectly diagnosed. You may be getting the wrong treatment instead of what you actually need at the moment. Wish you good luck! Let us know how it goes. Sending many hugs to you
MickeyCheeky is online now   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Old 01-11-2019, 07:46 AM   #5
Dnester
Poohbah
 
Dnester's Avatar
Dnester has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 1,359 (SuperPoster!)
My Mood: DID in the US

65 hugs
given
Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheltiemom2007 View Post
If you question the diagnosis, definitely get a second opinion from someone who is qualified to do the differential. Ask your psychiatrist for a referal to someone he's comfortable with. DID is not a label you want to have if it's not your diagnosis. The stigma that DID carries in the mental health treatment community is huge. Plus, you might be getting the wrong treatment for the illness you do have. Go for a second opinion and take it from there.
Can you tell me about the stigma?
Dnester is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 03:37 PM   #6
amandalouise
Wise Elder
 
amandalouise's Avatar
amandalouise has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 8,117 (SuperPoster!)
10 yr Member
744 hugs
given
PC PoohBah!
Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dnester View Post
Can you tell me about the stigma?
stigma with DID is the same with any other mental disorder. its just how people react to you after you tell them you have a mental disorder. some look down on it. only you can know whether you have told someone you have DID or not and how they reacted to you...

with me I had no stigma in regards to any of my mental disorders. those I chose to tell about it reacted very positively and helpful. why because they knew me before I was diagnosed. DID isnt something that just happens one day. it is there from before I was 5 years old. which means everyone in my life already knew me so to them seeing me as DID was just ok your no different than we have always known you to be....

in other words getting the diagnosis of DID doesnt change anything other than puts a name on what and how a person is since before they were 5 yrs old. if you have it then you are no different than you already have been since you were a very young child.
amandalouise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2019, 11:59 PM   #7
susannahsays
Poohbah
 
susannahsays's Avatar
susannahsays has no updates.
 
Member Since: Jun 2018
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 1,135 (SuperPoster!)
My Mood: DID in the US

Default Re: DID in the US

Many mental health practitioners don't even believe in DID. So yes, it's extremely stigmatized.
susannahsays is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Old 01-12-2019, 02:31 AM   #8
Amyjay
Grand Poohbah
Amyjay has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2017
Location: Underground
Posts: 1,830 (SuperPoster!)
502 hugs
given
Default Re: DID in the US

DID is still very much stigmatized in the mental health community. It's inclusion in the DSM hasn't done much to reduce the stigma that became attached to it during the 80s and 90s and the "false memory syndrome" debacle associated with that era. In a recent thread about DID on a therapists forum (in which most participants are based in the USA) only about 3 of the respondents said they have ever treated or diagnosed someone with DID while the vast majority of therapists said they didn't believe it even existed and were very skeptical of therapists who said they had seen it.

Meanwhile the general public is still really only informed on the topic by whatever garbage they are fed by the media. So. Yeah.
The general stance on DID tends to be one of two extremes: The majority of people are either informed by Sybil, the Three Faces of Eve, The United States of Tara, Split or Billy Milligan; or they believe its a fake disorder caused by bad therapists.

Thankfully there are also many wonderful therapists and researchers out there who carry on doing what they know regardless.

This is definitely not a "disorder" that anyone wants to have. It is far, far less socially understood or recognized than many other mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Last edited by Amyjay; 01-12-2019 at 03:09 AM..
Amyjay is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Old 01-12-2019, 09:13 AM   #9
Dnester
Poohbah
 
Dnester's Avatar
Dnester has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 1,359 (SuperPoster!)
My Mood: DID in the US

65 hugs
given
Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amyjay View Post
DID is still very much stigmatized in the mental health community. It's inclusion in the DSM hasn't done much to reduce the stigma that became attached to it during the 80s and 90s and the "false memory syndrome" debacle associated with that era. In a recent thread about DID on a therapists forum (in which most participants are based in the USA) only about 3 of the respondents said they have ever treated or diagnosed someone with DID while the vast majority of therapists said they didn't believe it even existed and were very skeptical of therapists who said they had seen it.

Meanwhile the general public is still really only informed on the topic by whatever garbage they are fed by the media. So. Yeah.
The general stance on DID tends to be one of two extremes: The majority of people are either informed by Sybil, the Three Faces of Eve, The United States of Tara, Split or Billy Milligan; or they believe its a fake disorder caused by bad therapists.

Thankfully there are also many wonderful therapists and researchers out there who carry on doing what they know regardless.

This is definitely not a "disorder" that anyone wants to have. It is far, far less socially understood or recognized than many other mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
It gets mixed up with schizophrenia alot doesnt it?
Dnester is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 01:31 PM   #10
Amyjay
Grand Poohbah
Amyjay has no updates.
 
Member Since: Mar 2017
Location: Underground
Posts: 1,830 (SuperPoster!)
502 hugs
given
Default Re: DID in the US

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dnester View Post
It gets mixed up with schizophrenia alot doesnt it?
There are a lot of lay people that don't understand the difference, yes. I would hope most therapists do understand the difference, but that is still different than believing in the disorder. I was shocked and disbelieving that so many of those therapists openly admitted they don't even believe it actually exists, or if they believe in it they think it is exceptionally rare (it isn't). Scary.


Dnester I know this doesn't relate to this thread but I just came across this while looking at some other things and thought it might interest you. Questions and Answers about Memories of Childhood Abuse
Amyjay is offline   Reply With Quote
"Thanks for this!" says:
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® — Copyright © 2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.




advertisement

 

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice,
diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider. .
Always consult your doctor or mental health professional before trying anything you read here.

 

HomeAbout UsContact UsPrivacy PolicyTerms of UseDisclaimer
Forums HomeCommunity GuidelinesHelp


 
Helplines and Lifelines