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Unread 10-09-2017, 04:48 AM   #1
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Confused where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

I have a 9 year old daughter (will be 10 yr. old in December). She has long had a variety of sensory issues along with other issues, such as potty training late (4 yr.), breastfeeding late (also 4 yr.), dislike of playing with children her own age (gravitates towards babies or teenagers or adults if she goes to anyone at all). I took her everywhere before she started school - mom's groups, library preschool story times, parks, gym daycare; she just wouldn't play with any other kids except her cousins, and in that case, she gravitated towards my oldest nephew (5 yr. older than she is). She practically ignored my one nephew only a few months older than she.

In kindergarten, her teacher was calling me nearly every day with some issue or other, such as at recess she would just stand there and cry or she wouldn't eat lunch (didn't like the lunch monitor seeing her eat). Eventually, she made a friend (a very outgoing girl who never met a stranger, which surprised me as my daughter is very introverted).

She has tons of sensory issues. In preschool, she got OCD about washing her hands for several months before she finally broke that habit (she would spend hours in the bathroom washing and re-washing her hands). She will not wear pants because of the feel. Sometimes, she would flap her hands when she got frustrated with me, such as when I told her it was time to do her spelling homework (her least favorite subject in school other than P.E.)

I look like a horrible parent sending her to school in dresses in the winter because of her not wearing pants and wonder how she will handle having to wear a gym uniform in 6th grade, but thankfully, we live in the Houston, TX area, and winters here are pretty mild (but still cold enough for pants).

Her socks must be worn inside-out. She hates loud noises so much that her school started sending her to the nurse's restroom, so she does not have to hear toilets flush or hand blow dryers. Using a public restroom, she will not use hand blow dryers and insists on hand sanitizer instead; I have to go into the stall with her and block any auto-flush mechanism the toilet may have, which with her being almost 10, is a pain. She will not eat any combined foods. My family thinks I'm crazy, but I just give up, and pull things out unseasoned as I'm cooking them (they say she will eat if hungry enough, but I don't believe it). Often, she displays a lack of understanding of others' emotions and believes her feelings trump all. On top of it, she is extremely bright. She reads English at a 12th grade level, scored 100% on last year's state exam in math (STAAR), has gotten medals in math competitions, and reads Spanish at a 4th grade level.

We are completely Anglo and speak absolutely no Spanish at home; she is in a dual language program in her elementary school. Of course, the school also diagnosed her as GT in kindergarten because of how quickly she learns things and how bright she is. She hates all changes and still has meltdowns at school. Sometimes the cause will be obvious and sometimes not. Going to the library is a nightmare for her. She often can't find books on her level in English (they are given a level by the Language Arts teacher and they are not to check out books below that level), especially in nonfiction as all she wants to read about is animals, and she has read all the animal books on her level in the school library. If the school has a change of routine, such as they watch a program put on by one of the grades or a police officer or fireman comes to talk to them, I will often get a call or email from her teacher or teachers (she has 2 main teachers) that she has been "off" all day, or even has had a major meltdown. They send her to the counselor or often the principal (she likes the principal who is wonderful and the school has had some turnover of counselors over the years, so she is less familiar with them).

Isn't she too old for meltdowns at nearly 10? This year, she is also starting puberty according to her pediatrician, so we get to throw hormones in the mix. Often, I pick her up from school and if something went wrong in her day (say her teacher made her show strategies working math problems which may have added 1 minute to her math assignment but that she feels is a giant waste of her time), she will yell at me. This yelling lasts anywhere from 15 minutes to over an hour. I give up trying to comfort her, and I finally requested a meeting with the school counselor to help her deal with stress in a healthy way. I have bipolar depression myself, so this yelling is very hard on me.

Sometimes, I wonder is she near having Asperger's syndrome (I am 99% sure my dad does have Asperger's but they didn't diagnose it back when he was a kid). Or is she just a normal pre-teen with lots of sensory issues? Where do you draw the line? I would take her in for diagnosis if not for money issues and my husband's resistance. He still thinks she will outgrow this, but I don't think so.

Last edited by CANDC; 10-09-2017 at 07:16 PM. Reason: add paragraph breaks
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Unread 10-11-2017, 09:09 AM   #2
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Hi. It seems to me that your daughter presents with a lot of symptoms of Aspergers (or autism now that they have removed Aspergers from the diagnosis list). Can you send a request to your school to test her for autism? I believe they should do it for free. This way she can get accommodations in school.

Here are things you mentioned that are related to autism:
-not relating to same age peers
-sensory issues (like clothing, food, noises)
-needs sameness and routine

Does she lack verbal or non-verbal social cues like being a literal thinker (not getting jokes or metaphors), having no or lack of body language, lack of eye contact, says "weird" things that don't make sense? How are her relationships in terms of friends? Does she speak in normal back-and-forth conversations? I see a lot of the repetitive behaviour things, but not much mention of the social aspect of autism, other than lack of relating to same aged peers.

I can't diagnose your daughter or anything, and since you said you can't afford testing, I would ask your school. Some accommodations if she qualifies she could get:
-ear phones to block out noises
-schedule changes notified in advance if possible
-social stories
-services like occupational therapy for the sensory aspect

I would strongly recommend you go this route to help your daughter succeed. Hope this helps.
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Unread 10-11-2017, 02:11 PM   #3
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Thanks so much. Yes, she is a very literal thinker. I often have to explain idioms to her, and she doesn't use them often in her speech. But, being so smart, once I've explained it, she usually remembers. She also has a tendency to put herself and her interests at the forefront - wants us talking her her stuff all the time, most especially random facts she gleans off the internet about My Little Ponies, all the generations of them, fake ponies poses that were most popular, I never knew there was even so much to know about My Little Ponies. She has the one friend she made, but this year, they have a different recess and she tells me she hates recess and just sits on the bench most days. (The friend is did make besides being a people person is also extremely empathic and good at reading all kinds of cues people make.) Sometimes, her conversations will be normal back and forth, but often, if I am asking her a question, I have to repeat myself many times. Then, she will snap at me that she heard me the first time (though she never answered or gave any sign of it) though usually these may be questions she doesn't like such as "Have you cleaned your room?", "How long have you been on your iPad?", etc.

One time the school did give her earphones for something now that you mention it. I think it was for lunchtime at kindergarten because she was not eating her lunch becausae of the noise and all that was going on around her. Kindergarten was really bad for her; one or other of her teachers was calling me daily. I had forgotten about the earphones, but she was really upset when I picked her up last Friday. The PTO was doing a fundraiser and they had some guy come up and get the kids all riled up about the fundraiser in the cafeteria, and she said the noise made her feel sick.

It is tough also to know what aspects of her behavior come from being an only child as well. And like I said, I am 99% sure my father has Asperger's. He just can't get on socially at all and just talks at people, not to them. I have zero relationship with my dad because of this. I don't dislike him, but my feelings towards him are complicated as he seemed to feel my love of reading fiction was a bad thing in school and that I should love to study electronics, mechanics, manuals, calculus, and physics. Now that I am a parent, I realize any parent would be proud and happy to have a child who loves to read, whether it's fiction or nonfiction. (And I wasn't bad at other subjects either - I graduated 1st in my class - I just loved English the most.) I definitely don't call him just to chat the way I do with my mom.

My husband is very resistant to getting her diagnosed and "labeled", but I think she would benefit, especially if the school had to offer the services. People don't just grow out of this right? Finances are tight since I don't work. My husband was not happy that I contacted the school counselor to arrange some therapy for my daughter so that she does not meltdown and scream at me from anywhere from 15 minutes to over an hour if things go wrong in her school day. I talk a little about her to my psychiatrist (I have bipolar), and she said it's likely all the constant stimuli at school make things worse for her with the obvious sensory issues. I wish I could bring her into to my psychiatrist for a proper diagnosis (she has a specialty in working with children), but I know my husband just wouldn't want to hear of it.
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Unread 10-12-2017, 02:11 PM   #4
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cln1812 View Post
Thanks so much. Yes, she is a very literal thinker. I often have to explain idioms to her, and she doesn't use them often in her speech. But, being so smart, once I've explained it, she usually remembers. She also has a tendency to put herself and her interests at the forefront - wants us talking her her stuff all the time, most especially random facts she gleans off the internet about My Little Ponies, all the generations of them, fake ponies poses that were most popular, I never knew there was even so much to know about My Little Ponies. She has the one friend she made, but this year, they have a different recess and she tells me she hates recess and just sits on the bench most days. (The friend is did make besides being a people person is also extremely empathic and good at reading all kinds of cues people make.) Sometimes, her conversations will be normal back and forth, but often, if I am asking her a question, I have to repeat myself many times. Then, she will snap at me that she heard me the first time (though she never answered or gave any sign of it) though usually these may be questions she doesn't like such as "Have you cleaned your room?", "How long have you been on your iPad?", etc.

One time the school did give her earphones for something now that you mention it. I think it was for lunchtime at kindergarten because she was not eating her lunch becausae of the noise and all that was going on around her. Kindergarten was really bad for her; one or other of her teachers was calling me daily. I had forgotten about the earphones, but she was really upset when I picked her up last Friday. The PTO was doing a fundraiser and they had some guy come up and get the kids all riled up about the fundraiser in the cafeteria, and she said the noise made her feel sick.

It is tough also to know what aspects of her behavior come from being an only child as well. And like I said, I am 99% sure my father has Asperger's. He just can't get on socially at all and just talks at people, not to them. I have zero relationship with my dad because of this. I don't dislike him, but my feelings towards him are complicated as he seemed to feel my love of reading fiction was a bad thing in school and that I should love to study electronics, mechanics, manuals, calculus, and physics. Now that I am a parent, I realize any parent would be proud and happy to have a child who loves to read, whether it's fiction or nonfiction. (And I wasn't bad at other subjects either - I graduated 1st in my class - I just loved English the most.) I definitely don't call him just to chat the way I do with my mom.

My husband is very resistant to getting her diagnosed and "labeled", but I think she would benefit, especially if the school had to offer the services. People don't just grow out of this right? Finances are tight since I don't work. My husband was not happy that I contacted the school counselor to arrange some therapy for my daughter so that she does not meltdown and scream at me from anywhere from 15 minutes to over an hour if things go wrong in her school day. I talk a little about her to my psychiatrist (I have bipolar), and she said it's likely all the constant stimuli at school make things worse for her with the obvious sensory issues. I wish I could bring her into to my psychiatrist for a proper diagnosis (she has a specialty in working with children), but I know my husband just wouldn't want to hear of it.
Hello, sorry for not replying sooner. I have been very busy lately.

So just using my own knowledge, I am a very literal thinker, but if someone explains to me an idiom, and the idiom actually makes sense (I still don't get the "money on your back" one), then I will know that it's an idiom, and its meaning.

When I was younger, I would always talk about my special interests, even if others were not interested in it. I couldn't read cues from other people that they were not interested in it, but this I have learned to cope with a lot better now. I now realize that people aren't interested in what I am interested in. I do sometimes ramble about my interest, but normally it isn't as long or as often as when I was younger.

Sometimes, at least for me, when someone asks me a question, I have to give an explanation or answer by talking about something else before I get into the answer to someone's question. Maybe it's like that for your daughter? Also, if you ask any kid about doing chores or spending too much time on electronics they will get mad at you. This isn't an unusual behaviour for any kid, so they may purposely ignore you because they don't want to stop doing something they enjoy or they don't want to do chores.

Was she fine with wearing headphones? Normally, for me, I like listening to music when it's noisy around me, since I can't stand pure quiet. But if your daughter likes pure quiet, you could use earplugs or those construction headphones. I hate the construction headphones though because I feel like my head is being compressed, so maybe like the noise-cancelling headphones. If your daughter was good wearing headphones or earplugs or whatever, then maybe you could talk to her teacher about allowing your daughter to use these during loud time periods in school. But if you do apply to get your daughter evaluated through the school for an IEP, then you could just add this as an accommodation.

Here is a link about setting up an IEP and getting an evaluation from ADDitude magazine. They are a site targeted for people with AD/HD, but many of the articles on here I find helpful more myself since they share many symptoms:
https://www.additudemag.com/504-plan...ons-at-school/

I do know that some people are against the idea of getting "labelled" with certain conditions like autism because they are afraid of the stigma associated with it. I like using the approach of analyzing the pros and cons of each. Is getting your daughter diagnosed with autism more beneficial or harmful? Is it worth the accommodations and services you can get for having a child with autism more beneficial than not? This is how I deal with things, since I think very logically, and like using facts when deciding something.

Autism is not something one can "out-grow", but they can learn to manage their symptoms better. I am a lot better in terms of managing my obsessive interest, but it doesn't mean that I don't have one anymore. It's just less noticeable to others. Autism is a life-long condition.

Are you covered for your pdoc, in terms of money? Are you able to ask your pdoc if she specializes in autism in female children, or girls with autism? Would it be possible to set up an appointment with your pdoc for your daughter?

In the end though, it is a decision between you and your partner on whether you would like her evaluated. I hope my information helps you though.
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Unread 10-13-2017, 06:00 AM   #5
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, we've hit a wall with our insurance and now have a super-high $7500 deductible to meet. I've even had to tell my pdoc to charge me as a patient without insurance (she lowers the amount). It is possible she would do the same for my daughter, though I know the initial intake interview is more expensive than normal appointments. The hard part would be getting my husband to agree to getting her evaluated, and he is so against it. If we wait until January, our insurance will roll over, and the amount we pay will be much lower.

My daughter generally "blends" at school now for the most part. Obviously, she will never buy the school lunch and must bring it from home. She won't even eat pizza when the PTO buys it for parties at Christmas and end-of-year and gets upset if juice gets passed out to drink (she prefers water). She won't wear pants or shorts at all, just dresses. In 6th grade, I'm thinking I might have to get her labeled to somehow work her way out of her having to wear a P.E. uniform because I know she won't take to it at all. She is also very put out at me because I make her wearing a training bra with about half her dresses now since she is developing. She will spend over 15 min. each morning trying to get comfortable, longer if I don't prod her on. Her hair is an unkempt mess, and I've only just gotten her to let me clip it back because she now has to wear glasses this year, and it really needs to be kept out of the glasses during the day. Before that and during the weekend, she looks like a wild child with her hair a huge mess. She is now in 4th grade. However, she is now having meltdowns after school because her math teacher is requiring them to show work in 2 digit multiplication (problems like 25 x 63). It so happened last year, she entered a math competition called Number Sense where students are not allowed to show any math work and only write down answers and learned how to do this multiplication mentally, so she feels the "strategy" is a waste of her time. In addition, the strategy is weird; I didn't even learn to multiply that way; you box up the numbers in a chart, and it's really strange. My daughter feels this is a waste of her time since she can do it mentally and get the right answer then has a giant meltdown after school most days over math homework. I think later the teacher plans to teach them the traditional multiplication technique, but it does puzzle me why they start with this method, which even confuses my daughter who is extremely bright in math.

My daughter does not like the feel of headphones but will tolerate them. She says they don't block out the noise enough and also worries about other kids making fun of her. She was a big target of a "frenemy" last year because of how literally she took things and did not always realize the girl was making fun of her until she saw other kids laughing at some remark this girl made; thank goodness, that girl is not in her class this year.

It has been a lucky thing that my daughter made it into the dual language program in her school district (there was actually testing pre-kindergarten, and she was re-districted from the elementary school she would have attended based on where we live). Those 2 dual language classes have been kept together since kindergarten; sometimes the homeroom kids vary, but they are used to the same group of roughly 36 kids being around them. A lot of them realize my daughter hates loud noises and tend to just take it as part of her personality, the same with her having meltdowns. She had another meltdown at the library because she finished reading a fiction series on her level (which is high so not many books in the elementary school library to choose from). I think she just wants to be able to go to the exact same area of the library and pick a book from a familiar series to check out. She also told me that they are out of animal nonfiction books on her level in English, which will likely lead to another meltdown, even though I've suggested to her maybe she might like to read about something else like space, the rainforest, other countries (since they are a dual language school, the library has lots of nonfiction books focusing on Spanish-speaking countries), or fossils & gems (which she has shown some interest in). She won't hear of it. The worst thing is her 2 best friends had to quit the dual language program, one because her English was falling below grade level and the 2nd (also an extremely extroverted gir) because her father passed away suddenly and the mom didn't think she could keep up with it. The one best friend was so empathic and often helped my daughter during meltdowns, getting through to her during meltdowns (very rare) and getting my daughter do things to calm her down, like encouraging deep breathing. I was so, so sad when that girl had to stop the dual language program because of how well she understood my daughter (she just has a gift for understanding other people, I think). I do think my daughter is doing better at getting along in school than she did in kindergarten, so perhaps she is adapting some socially. At least, I don't get multiple emails or calls from her teachers each week.
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Unread 10-13-2017, 02:09 PM   #6
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cln1812 View Post
Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, we've hit a wall with our insurance and now have a super-high $7500 deductible to meet. I've even had to tell my pdoc to charge me as a patient without insurance (she lowers the amount). It is possible she would do the same for my daughter, though I know the initial intake interview is more expensive than normal appointments. The hard part would be getting my husband to agree to getting her evaluated, and he is so against it. If we wait until January, our insurance will roll over, and the amount we pay will be much lower.

My daughter generally "blends" at school now for the most part. Obviously, she will never buy the school lunch and must bring it from home. She won't even eat pizza when the PTO buys it for parties at Christmas and end-of-year and gets upset if juice gets passed out to drink (she prefers water). She won't wear pants or shorts at all, just dresses. In 6th grade, I'm thinking I might have to get her labeled to somehow work her way out of her having to wear a P.E. uniform because I know she won't take to it at all. She is also very put out at me because I make her wearing a training bra with about half her dresses now since she is developing. She will spend over 15 min. each morning trying to get comfortable, longer if I don't prod her on. Her hair is an unkempt mess, and I've only just gotten her to let me clip it back because she now has to wear glasses this year, and it really needs to be kept out of the glasses during the day. Before that and during the weekend, she looks like a wild child with her hair a huge mess. She is now in 4th grade. However, she is now having meltdowns after school because her math teacher is requiring them to show work in 2 digit multiplication (problems like 25 x 63). It so happened last year, she entered a math competition called Number Sense where students are not allowed to show any math work and only write down answers and learned how to do this multiplication mentally, so she feels the "strategy" is a waste of her time. In addition, the strategy is weird; I didn't even learn to multiply that way; you box up the numbers in a chart, and it's really strange. My daughter feels this is a waste of her time since she can do it mentally and get the right answer then has a giant meltdown after school most days over math homework. I think later the teacher plans to teach them the traditional multiplication technique, but it does puzzle me why they start with this method, which even confuses my daughter who is extremely bright in math.

My daughter does not like the feel of headphones but will tolerate them. She says they don't block out the noise enough and also worries about other kids making fun of her. She was a big target of a "frenemy" last year because of how literally she took things and did not always realize the girl was making fun of her until she saw other kids laughing at some remark this girl made; thank goodness, that girl is not in her class this year.

It has been a lucky thing that my daughter made it into the dual language program in her school district (there was actually testing pre-kindergarten, and she was re-districted from the elementary school she would have attended based on where we live). Those 2 dual language classes have been kept together since kindergarten; sometimes the homeroom kids vary, but they are used to the same group of roughly 36 kids being around them. A lot of them realize my daughter hates loud noises and tend to just take it as part of her personality, the same with her having meltdowns. She had another meltdown at the library because she finished reading a fiction series on her level (which is high so not many books in the elementary school library to choose from). I think she just wants to be able to go to the exact same area of the library and pick a book from a familiar series to check out. She also told me that they are out of animal nonfiction books on her level in English, which will likely lead to another meltdown, even though I've suggested to her maybe she might like to read about something else like space, the rainforest, other countries (since they are a dual language school, the library has lots of nonfiction books focusing on Spanish-speaking countries), or fossils & gems (which she has shown some interest in). She won't hear of it. The worst thing is her 2 best friends had to quit the dual language program, one because her English was falling below grade level and the 2nd (also an extremely extroverted gir) because her father passed away suddenly and the mom didn't think she could keep up with it. The one best friend was so empathic and often helped my daughter during meltdowns, getting through to her during meltdowns (very rare) and getting my daughter do things to calm her down, like encouraging deep breathing. I was so, so sad when that girl had to stop the dual language program because of how well she understood my daughter (she just has a gift for understanding other people, I think). I do think my daughter is doing better at getting along in school than she did in kindergarten, so perhaps she is adapting some socially. At least, I don't get multiple emails or calls from her teachers each week.
Hi, so is it possible for you to talk to your husband and explain that your daughter needs help in school in order to do the best she can? No one but you and the school (like staff) if you do decide to tell them will know about any diagnosis your daughter has. No one in her class like her friends and classmates would know unless she/you decide to tell them.

In my own opinion, I see a diagnosis as explaining why I am this way. It helps me understand why I can't stand loud noises or tags on my clothing or dealing with changes in schedule. I just see it as an explanation. I am considered to be smart, and when I was younger, I was always confused on why people were mean to me or why I did certain things, but when I was diagnosed, I realized that it was because of this that I did certain things and these things I did were not considered "normal" to children my own age, so they thought it was funny to pick on. I'm not saying it's right for them to do that, just why they might think this way.

Maybe it's possible that you ask around and get quotes on pricing. You don't need to decide today what does and doesn't need to be done. Have you looked into what I mentioned about the school doing an assessment? I am not familiar with how to do this, which is why I provided a link. I got my assessment done privately because I needed an official diagnosis for university. Schools don't do official diagnosis generally speaking; they just use it to figure out accommodations. This may be a better idea if your husband doesn't want a label, since this would only be used in the school system and isn't considered official. You wouldn't be able to access out-of-school services though. Also, I am not 100% about how the assessments in the schools work, but this is what I have read, or have heard from people who got learning disabilities diagnosed through the school system.

You could always wait to do an assessment once your insurance lowers. There isn't a rush, unless your daughter is suffering from the affects of it more and more each day. But I can not judge this.

Also, I did want to bring up a diagnosis called "sensory processing disorder". It's a condition where someone has "extreme" reactions to different sensory inputs like sounds, tastes, sights, etc.. There is no problems with social skills or problems with things like intense interests or "weird" body movements.

Because of your daughter's sensory issues, I would advise looking into occupational therapy, which is a type of therapy to help your daughter manage her sensory issues using different techniques. I do not know what happens in these sessions, as I have personally never done this, though I would like to look into it for myself.

But I do understand your daughter's math struggles. When I was in grade 5, so I believe that's a year older than your daughter is now (I don't remember, sorry), I already knew how to do short division, but my school was teaching us long division, and I was quite upset because I knew of a faster way to solving the problem. I solved all the division problems really quickly, but had to redo all of them because I didn't use long division, which didn't make sense to me (at the time). I thought the point of the question was to solve the problem.

I do understand the feeling of headphones. The construction headphones I received were too tight around my ears, and I can't wear the in-the-ear ones, since they really hurt my ears, so I have over-the-ear headphones which I quite like, but still can't wear for a long period of time. Can you try earplugs? This way, no one will know your daughter is wearing them, as she can cover her ears with her hair, and it will be a lot quieter. The best thing for me is wearing earplugs and then wearing headphones over-top of them, but I understand that this may be unpractical.

Is is possible for you to buy your daughter her own books that she can bring to school or just read at home after school that are more her level? You could even go to a second-hand store or look around garage sales since money seems an issue. This way, your daughter is reading something she likes but is also challenged. Having your daughter read is a lot better than her doing other things. It expands her vocabulary, her reading comprehension, and does also help improve her writing skills. When I was a kid, my interest was tigers, and I would always check out my school's books on tigers. I was even told that I couldn't check them out anymore because I had to let other people use them, even though no one else did because it was weird for someone my age (this was grade 2/3) to check out non-fiction books.

It sucks that her friends changed schools. It may seem tough now, and for a few months, but eventually she will make a new friend. I do understand the difficulties of making friends. Even right now, I don't really have many friends, if any at the moment.

Anyways, I hope this helps. Sorry that I kinda rambled. This is normally my train of thought.
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DX: Social anxiety disorder, GAD, ASD, depression, unsure if OCD is diagnosed (long story)

RX: Effexor XR, 75mg; Ativan 0.5 mg PRN

Previous RX: Zoloft, 25-75mg; Lexapro 5-15mg; Luvox 25-50mg


I have ASD so please be kind if I say something socially unacceptable. Thank you.
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Unread 10-13-2017, 02:11 PM   #7
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Oh, and here is a link of an article that was just posted on psych central about sensory processing disorder.

https://blogs.psychcentral.com/savvy...areness-month/
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I have ASD so please be kind if I say something socially unacceptable. Thank you.
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Unread 10-13-2017, 08:15 PM   #8
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Thanks so much. I do wonder if she just has the sensory processing disorder or something more. She's also been behind in motor skills, didn't even know how to jump until after she was 3 years old. She didn't potty train until she was 4 though when she was 2 years old, she very clearly told me, "I can, I not", which I took to mean she could use the toilet if she wanted to, she just chose not too. When she was younger, she would still wear pants, skirts, or shorts, but now all she will wear is dresses. She still can't tie a bow or ride a bike. But, then again, give her Legos, and she is happy. If she wants to accomplish something, she can do it, but I cannot get her to desire to tie a bow, wash her hair completely on her own (she hates the shower because of the water spray and so has to wash her hair the bath which causes more tangles and refuses to brush out the tangles on her own), even pick out her own clothes. Sometimes, I worry that I enable her, but if I don't pick an outfit for her, she'll stand there upset, wasting 10 minutes of her night, getting everyone in a bad mood before bedtime, and it's something I can do in less than a minute and have done without a fit.

About the library books, I think the teachers don't mind if they come from home as long as they are on her level as long as there is a computer-generated AR test on the book. That can be checked on a website called AR book finder on using a cell phone with internet service. A local library is having a book sale this weekend, and I think I will check it out; they sell most children's books (even tween and teen books) for 50 cents a piece. Otherwise, I can check out books through our local library though the local branch doesn't have a ton of stuff; however, it is part of the giant library system that covers the Houston area, and you can usually request anything you like from one of the other branches in the system and have it delivered to the local branch. I might start doing that for her. The other difficulty is that while she reads at a 12th grade level, she is still a 4th grader and 9 years old. She does not want to read about people or animals dying or high school love stories and prefers to read about middle school issues, most of which fall below her reading level (with the exception of the books she has to check out in Spanish, which she reads on grade level since we are Anglo and speak absolutely no Spanish at home).

I have emailed the counselor about an assessment and not heard back from her; however, she was at the last PTO meeting and had been very sick with something and on a ton of medications from her doctor, so she might be behind. In addition, our area of Texas was hit hard by Harvey, and my daughter's school is trying to helped some 20 families in the school that were displaced by the storm and pretty much lost everything. I figure I will give the counselor a couple more days and then maybe put in a phone call to her.
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Unread 10-14-2017, 11:37 PM   #9
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cln1812 View Post
Thanks so much. I do wonder if she just has the sensory processing disorder or something more. She's also been behind in motor skills, didn't even know how to jump until after she was 3 years old. She didn't potty train until she was 4 though when she was 2 years old, she very clearly told me, "I can, I not", which I took to mean she could use the toilet if she wanted to, she just chose not too. When she was younger, she would still wear pants, skirts, or shorts, but now all she will wear is dresses. She still can't tie a bow or ride a bike. But, then again, give her Legos, and she is happy. If she wants to accomplish something, she can do it, but I cannot get her to desire to tie a bow, wash her hair completely on her own (she hates the shower because of the water spray and so has to wash her hair the bath which causes more tangles and refuses to brush out the tangles on her own), even pick out her own clothes. Sometimes, I worry that I enable her, but if I don't pick an outfit for her, she'll stand there upset, wasting 10 minutes of her night, getting everyone in a bad mood before bedtime, and it's something I can do in less than a minute and have done without a fit.

About the library books, I think the teachers don't mind if they come from home as long as they are on her level as long as there is a computer-generated AR test on the book. That can be checked on a website called AR book finder on using a cell phone with internet service. A local library is having a book sale this weekend, and I think I will check it out; they sell most children's books (even tween and teen books) for 50 cents a piece. Otherwise, I can check out books through our local library though the local branch doesn't have a ton of stuff; however, it is part of the giant library system that covers the Houston area, and you can usually request anything you like from one of the other branches in the system and have it delivered to the local branch. I might start doing that for her. The other difficulty is that while she reads at a 12th grade level, she is still a 4th grader and 9 years old. She does not want to read about people or animals dying or high school love stories and prefers to read about middle school issues, most of which fall below her reading level (with the exception of the books she has to check out in Spanish, which she reads on grade level since we are Anglo and speak absolutely no Spanish at home).

I have emailed the counselor about an assessment and not heard back from her; however, she was at the last PTO meeting and had been very sick with something and on a ton of medications from her doctor, so she might be behind. In addition, our area of Texas was hit hard by Harvey, and my daughter's school is trying to helped some 20 families in the school that were displaced by the storm and pretty much lost everything. I figure I will give the counselor a couple more days and then maybe put in a phone call to her.
It would be suggested to get an evaluation done to determine what is the cause of these symptoms, as I am not a professional in any means.

I really hope you find some books that she will enjoy!

It is fine to give a few more days. I don't expect people to reply immediately to me either. I understand that there are a lot of other factors in your area why things may be taking longer than they normally would. Whenever you get a response is good, and will hopefully lead you further done the right path. Good luck.
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RX: Effexor XR, 75mg; Ativan 0.5 mg PRN

Previous RX: Zoloft, 25-75mg; Lexapro 5-15mg; Luvox 25-50mg


I have ASD so please be kind if I say something socially unacceptable. Thank you.
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Unread 10-14-2017, 11:39 PM   #10
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Default Re: where do you draw the line between sensory issues & Aspergers?

I think Nike007 has covered it pretty well so I don't have much to add, but as someone who didn't realize she was autistic until adulthood, I think early diagnosis and help can be very important. Your daughter does sound a lot like me when I was a kid, though my sensory issues weren't that severe. I understand your husband's hesitation, and of course it's ultimately up to you both, but risking the label is worth it if it will help keep her from struggling more later on in life.

Good luck with everyone.
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