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Old 06-02-2018, 12:27 PM   #11
MistressStayc
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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Originally Posted by hprodf View Post
Apologies if my post has offended you, I didn't have the intention to generalise or suggest anything untrue. You're not wrong, not all people who have autism will suffer from cognitive disabilities, my point was to try and explain common differences that are found between those with aspergers and other forms of autism.

Anyway, if my post is in any way misleading to anyone, please accept my apologies, I'll try to choose my words more carefully in future.

you did not offend me I just didnt want anyone who is less informed to think all people with autism have cognitive disabilities or all people with asperger's have some exceptional skill...I understand what you were saying though. its just a very unique disorder and is unique to everyone who has it. it can be very hard to explain in layman's terms without getting too technical.
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Old 06-02-2018, 12:33 PM   #12
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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Originally Posted by cats! View Post
I hope this comes across as kind and informative, and not me just rocking the boat...
Asperger's syndrome was a previous DSM diagnosis that generally meant autism with no speech delays or intellectual disabilities. This is the source of the stereotype that autism=intellectual disability and aspergers=gifted.
However, if you want to be specific and dispel misconceptions then: autism is autism. The trouble with functioning labels is that there is no consistency in how they're used - this is why aspergers was dropped from the DSM and is now referred to as Autism 1.
In my personal experience, functioning labels have only ever served other people's capacity to validate or dismiss me. They don't reflect what specific supports I need or my development (not to mention I can go from low to high functioning multiple times in a single day lol!).

It doesn't come across as rocking the boat at all...I didn't realize there was something like Autism 1. I thought it was just categorized as mild, moderate and severe now. I'll have to re read.
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Old 06-03-2018, 03:43 PM   #13
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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I heard a psych nurse in the hospital make a statement that those with Asberger's see the World differently. How exactly did he mean it? (I know that I see the World differently than others because speaking and relationships are stumbling blocks for me.) How do you see the World? Where do you excel and where do you falter?
The world is generally an intimidating place for me, because I lack qualities people expect others to have such as charisma, and it is filled with offensive odors and noises that assault my senses. Usually I am worn out, when I get home. I generally have to take a nap, but before I do, I have to change my clothes and wash the 'odors of the world' off of me.

Recently I found a place, where I feel comfortable, and where I am respected, so it is definitely possible to find one's place without being a charismatic extrovert.

I'm naturally drawn to things(
not people) and noticing details and patterns in them. This makes me excel at reverse engineering, fabrication and repairing anything mechanical. I'm also artistic.

I generally find people mysterious especially ones that are my gender (female).

My weak point is socializing and making friends. I'm able to make friends and have a few, but it takes a long time. Most people seem to misinterpret my quiet disposition. I've been accused of being intimidating and indifferent a lot.

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Old 06-12-2018, 02:27 AM   #14
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

First off, let me say I don't have Asperger's but I have a lot of Asperger tendencies. I've also taken several college classes that had units on Autism + Aspergers.

I, too, don't wish to rock the boat regarding the previous posts but as far as I was taught, Autism is the umbrella term for a spectrum that ranges from Rett Syndrome (least functioning and has a limited life expectancy due to degenerative brain issues) to Asperger's (highest functioning). Just because these labels apply doesn't mean that's that -- there are spectrums within these too so there's high functioning Asperger's, low functioning, etc.

One of my professors said something that really stuck with me: People with Asperger's are Autistic but are "normal" (his word) enough to know they are different and want to be "normal." Again, as I'm not an Aspie I can't quite comment on that but as a high functioning Borderline (Personality Disorder), I can say that I think that's true about anyone that's high functioning.

I'm guessing this is part of my Asperger tendencies but I can't be sure... But I can't figure out why people act the way they do. It never makes sense to me and it bothers me to no end that I don't understand it. I enjoy coming home (I live alone) so I can relax and no have to worry about understanding peoples' motivations for doing things.

Again, this is just me and one of my Aspie tendencies -- I don't have Asperger's so I can't speak of a generalized world view for those for Asperger's.
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Old 06-12-2018, 11:47 AM   #15
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

People with Asperger's are Autistic but are "normal" (his word) enough to know they are different and want to be "normal."

Not sure if I have Asperger's, but tendencies the least. I surely realized I was an outcast and perceived as different, and in that sense I felt I wasn't normal. I would have liked to have more friends, be accepted and included. And I think this means I wanted to be like the others, just without the bother of having to behave like them and sharing the same interests. Given my dyspraxia I was realitic enough to see this was not a possibility for the larger part of male socializing, i.e. team sports like football.

And at some point the realization kicked in that I actually didn't want to be normal.
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Old 06-12-2018, 02:44 PM   #16
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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One of my professors said something that really stuck with me: People with Asperger's are Autistic but are "normal" (his word) enough to know they are different and want to be "normal."
I longed to be normal, before I was diagnosed with ASD. I had no idea why I was different and treated like an outcast. Being alone was the only time I ever felt comfortable and at peace, because I could be myself. I longed for others to accept my genuine self. Acting was stressful and it made me miserable.

The diagnosis liberated me. I've embraced who I am fully. Now I have no desire to be normal.
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Old 06-12-2018, 06:16 PM   #17
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

The best way to learn about Aspergers besides going on this website is to read a book about it. Maybe more than one book would be good because every other website and every other author all seem to have different opinions. However, they are all similar. You will then understand a lot that you never did before. It is a huge relief to have an answer for all of the questions you had all of your life. Best of luck with this!
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Old 06-17-2018, 07:11 PM   #18
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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you did not offend me I just didnt want anyone who is less informed to think all people with autism have cognitive disabilities or all people with asperger's have some exceptional skill...I understand what you were saying though. its just a very unique disorder and is unique to everyone who has it. it can be very hard to explain in layman's terms without getting too technical.
I have a nephew who had asbergers! He has trouble fitting in!
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Old 06-17-2018, 07:13 PM   #19
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It doesn't come across as rocking the boat at all...I didn't realize there was something like Autism 1. I thought it was just categorized as mild, moderate and severe now. I'll have to re read.
I always looking for new information so that I can understand better and help my nephew.
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Old 06-17-2018, 07:17 PM   #20
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Default Re: How Asbergers see the World

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The best way to learn about Aspergers besides going on this website is to read a book about it. Maybe more than one book would be good because every other website and every other author all seem to have different opinions. However, they are all similar. You will then understand a lot that you never did before. It is a huge relief to have an answer for all of the questions you had all of your life. Best of luck with this!
That great advice! I will used that!
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